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Album Review: Unbounded
Marc Enfroy
Cover image of the album Unbounded by Marc Enfroy
Unbounded
Marc Enfroy
2008 / Enfroy Music
46 minutes
Review by Michael Debbage
Marc Enfroy is a new artist to the musical scene who self describes his music as Cinematic Piano. Whether that is a fully accurate statement is yet to be seen. However, one thing for certain is that Unbounded is a very emotional musical statement. After his sister lost her battle to cancer, Enfroy turned to composing music to find peace and hope. What was conceived as an escape has now transformed into the sturdy debut of pianist Marc Enfroy.

All twelve compositions are written, performed and produced by Marc Enfroy and while he is attempting to create his own signature sound there are elements of Yanni and the lesser known artist Brian Crain. The former on a smaller scale can be best heard on “Empire Bluff” which builds over its four minute duration that also includes very effective use of strings and cymbals. Meanwhile, the repeated chorus of “Mare Nostrum” shows elements of Brian Crain’s successful trademark. Both of the above themes are revisited via the other impressive compositions present on Unbounded.

The album closes out with the dreamy “Moonlit Dreams” that includes some very fine choral like angelic keyboard effects that shows an artist looking to provide his listening audience with something a little different. Otherwise, there are no significant surprises except for how moving this debut is, relying heavily on melody, emotion and simple innocence. Clearly, this is a solid debut that would suggest that more good things can be expected from Marc Enfroy.
July 24, 2008
This review has been tagged as:
Debut Albums
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